Translations


 

THE ULURU STATEMENT IN YOUR LANGUAGE

The Uluru Dialogue partnered with SBS Radio to translate the Uluru Statement into many of Australia’s multicultural languages. This work aligned with the Uluru Dialogue’s community education mission and SBS’s community education initiative. The Uluru Dialogue also has its own Aboriginal languages project led by Pat Anderson AO. We have now translated the Statement into more than 20 Aboriginal languages (from communities in the Northern Territory and from Northern Western Australia) and with SBS, 60 languages for Australia’s culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

We will continue to grow as more First Nations languages are translated.

Find your language below in podcast or in written form.

This initiative first began as a partnership between the Uluru Dialogue and North Sydney Council.

 
 

Find your language

Northern Territory Aboriginal Translations

The Northern Territory is one of the most linguistically diverse areas of the world. For comprehensive information about Aboriginal languages of the Northern Territory visit aiatsis.gov.au.

Alyawarr

Alyawarr is from the Alice Springs and Tennant Creek regions of the Northern Territory, part of the Arandic language family.


Anindilyakwa

Anindilyakwa is from the Top End region of the Northern Territory.


Anmatyerr

Anmatyerr is from the Alice Springs and Tennant Creek regions of the Northern Territory, part of the Arandic language family.


Burarra

Burarra is the Top End region of the Northern Territory.


Eastern/Central Arrernte

Eastern/Central Arrernte is from the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, part of the Arandic language family.


East Side Kriol

East Side Kriol is from the Katherine region of the Northern Territory.


Kunwinjku

Kunwinjku is from the Top End region of the Northern Territory.


Maung

Maung is from the Top End region of the Northern Territory.


Modern Tiwi

Modern Tiwi is from the Tiwi Islands of the Northern Territory.


Ngarinyman

Ngarinyman is from the Victoria Daly region of the Northern Territory.


Pintupi-Luritja

Pintupi-Luritja is from the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, part of the Western Desert language family.


Pitjantjatjara

Pitjantjatjara is from the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, part of the Western Desert language family.


Warlpiri

Warlpiri is from the Katherine, Tennant Creek and Alice Springs regions of the Northern Territory.


Warumungu

Warumungu is from the Tennant Creek region of the Northern Territory.


Western Arrarnta

Western Arrarnta is from the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, part of the Arandic language family.


West Side Kriol

West Side Kriol is from the Katherine region of the Northern Territory.


Yolngu Matha

Yolngu Matha is from the Top End region of the Northern Territory.


West Australian Aboriginal Translations

Kriol

Kriol is an English-based creole language spoken across the north of Australia, from Western Australia into the Northern Territory and part of Queensland. The spelling of the name is a version of ‘Creole’. There are many creole languages spoken. Creoles developed out of pidgin English that came into being as a result of colonisation. Thecreoles spoken across the north of Australia vary from east to west and there are several dialects, even within the Kimberley region.


Martu Wangka

Martu Wangka means 'Aboriginal language' and it is spoken by about 800 to 1000 Martu people around the Gibson and Great Sandy Desert area of Western Australia. The communities where a significant number Martu Wangka speakers live are Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji. Martu Wangka is also of the Wati subgroup/ a dialect of the Western Desert language of the Pama-Nyungan language family.


Ngaanyatjarra

Ngaanyatjarra is one of the Wati subgroup of languages of the large Pama-Nyungan family. It is one of the dialects of the Western Desert language. Most Ngaanyatjarra people live in one of the communities of Warburton, Warakurna, Tjukurla, Papulankutja, Mantamaru or Kaltukatjara.


Nyangumarta

Nyangumarta is a language in Western Australia that comes from the western side of the Great Sandy Desert, where the desert meets the sea, towards 80 Mile Beach. Nyangumarta is still spoken today. It is a very strong language and strong culture. Our way of life is hunting in the bush and going fishing in the seaside, during the right seasons. Song and dance are still carried out today and is very important to us Nyangumarta people.


CALD Translations



































































Auslan translation

Watch The Uluru Statement from the Heart in Auslan

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This site includes images, quotes and references to people who have passed. We have included them to acknowledge, honour and pay respect to their contribution and efforts to our struggles, our progress and achievements.

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